Your Guide to

The Philosophy of Nodism

Dr Abstract
8 min readJan 7, 2021

Hierarchy revisited in this age of Object Oriented Programming

Welcome readers from ◎ Your Guide to the Mechanics of Creativity

Isomorphisms of Hierarchy Used Crazy Carpet Mural — Hamilton Canada 2015 — Dan Zen

NODISM

Nodism is a philosophy born from Object Oriented Programming but accessible to all. Even if you have not coded, let’s think about it for a second —coders use logic to make GAMES, SIMULATIONS and AI.

Games, simulations and Artificial Intelligence model life. The logical modeling of life is called Philosophy. Coders are practicing philosophy.

  • The philosophy is called Nodism.
  • Followers are part of the Nodist Colony!

This guide will take you through the history and basics of Nodism.

HISTORY OF NODISM

In the winter of 2005, Dan Zen was “crazy-person writing” in his sketchbook. Looking for a name for the writing, he called it node notes and then in an “improvement” box, decided it should be a philosophy. He wrote nodology, nodelgy, nodogy, and then nodism. Nodism sounded good and somewhat goofingly familiar. Ten years later, he had amassed hundreds of pages of crazy person writing and a simpler understanding of our world.

Dan Zen coins Nodism in 2005 in node notes writings

To find out more about Dan Zen please see:

Your Guide to Inventor Dan Zen

GOAL OF NODISM

A goal of Nodism is to connect the laws of physics with what we sentient beings sense and understand. Nodism is the study of nesting — both in composition and classification. Composition is physical — spatial and temporal. Classification is mental — the recognition of similar properties. Both can be described by hierarchy diagrams so a large part of Nodism is the study of hierarchy and how it is used in all disciplines.

Isomorphisms of Hierarchy Sketch for Creativity Framework

Nodism also recognizes thought as being physical, so even as we classify, there is composition…

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Dr Abstract

Inventor, Founder of ZIM JavaScript Canvas Framework and Nodism, Professor of Interactive Media at Sheridan, Canadian New Media Awards Programmer and Educator